In Defense of Life

fitnessgeekpdx:

overweightnomore:

ohhhhhh no one says that about music

MAYBE if we convince everyone to finish school and not get stuck in fast food, FAST FOOD WILL DIE along with all of it’s disgusting production and waste

fitnessgeekpdx:

overweightnomore:

ohhhhhh no one says that about music

MAYBE if we convince everyone to finish school and not get stuck in fast food, FAST FOOD WILL DIE along with all of it’s disgusting production and waste

sagansense:

The Sun completes one rotation every 25 days.

via infinity-imagined

“The sun is the nearest star: a glowing sphere of gas, shining because of its heat, like a red-hot poker. The surface we see in ordinary visible light is at 6 thousand degrees centigrade. But, in its hidden interior, in the nuclear furnace where sunlight is ultimately generated, its temperature is 20 million degrees. All this churning power is driven by the sun’s interior which is converting 400 million tons of hydrogen into helium every second. The sun is a great fusion reactor into which a million earths would fit. Luckily for us, it’s safely placed 150 million kilometers away.

Plants harvest sunlight, converting solar into chemical energy. We and the other animals are parasites on the plants; so we are, all of us: solar powered. The evolution of life is driven by mutations; they’re caused partly by natural radioactivity and cosmic rays, but they are both generated in the spectacular deaths of stars thousands of light years distant.

Think of the sun’s heat on your upturned face on a cloudless summer’s day: from 100 million kilometers away, we recognize its power. What would we feel on its seething, self-luminous surface, or immersed in its heart of nuclear fire? And yet, the sun is an ordinary, even a mediocre star. Our ancestors worshipped the sun and they were far from foolish. It makes good sense to revere the sun and the stars because: we are their children.”

Carl Sagan; Cosmos | Stellar Evolution

sagansense:

The Sun completes one rotation every 25 days.

via infinity-imagined

“The sun is the nearest star: a glowing sphere of gas, shining because of its heat, like a red-hot poker. The surface we see in ordinary visible light is at 6 thousand degrees centigrade. But, in its hidden interior, in the nuclear furnace where sunlight is ultimately generated, its temperature is 20 million degrees. All this churning power is driven by the sun’s interior which is converting 400 million tons of hydrogen into helium every second. The sun is a great fusion reactor into which a million earths would fit. Luckily for us, it’s safely placed 150 million kilometers away.

Plants harvest sunlight, converting solar into chemical energy. We and the other animals are parasites on the plants; so we are, all of us: solar powered. The evolution of life is driven by mutations; they’re caused partly by natural radioactivity and cosmic rays, but they are both generated in the spectacular deaths of stars thousands of light years distant.

Think of the sun’s heat on your upturned face on a cloudless summer’s day: from 100 million kilometers away, we recognize its power. What would we feel on its seething, self-luminous surface, or immersed in its heart of nuclear fire? And yet, the sun is an ordinary, even a mediocre star. Our ancestors worshipped the sun and they were far from foolish. It makes good sense to revere the sun and the stars because: we are their children.”

Carl Sagan; Cosmos | Stellar Evolution

(Source: sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov)

sinobug:

Murder Most Foul…..

A few days ago I was witness to a most brutal predator/prey interaction.

I was alerted by a rustling in the leaf litter where I found this adult stick insect (about 25cm in length) furiously trying to escape the large wasp taking huge chomps out of its back. I presume this is a Polistes sp. paper wasp but a large one at around 25mm in length. The obvious aim of the wasp was to debilitate its prey by the swiftest means possible - by severing through the entire abdomen, wings and all, and cleaving the stick insect into two. It achieved this with ease and the hapless stick insect, now minus its abdomen and incapable of flight, took to frantic climbing and clambering to escape. The wasp however clawed its way further along towards the head making deep incisions as it went. After about five minutes the stick insect succumbed to this relentless mutilation.

I thought the choice of prey by this wasp was unusual but in hindsight, the stick insect is an easy target as it has little defence against such an onslaught other than the ability to avoid it in the first place by concealment. It is perhaps that helplessness on the part of a large, gentle victim that makes it seem so cruel.

So…..a one-off observation? Two days later and I was witness to the exact same scenario in a similar location between another adult phasmid and a paper wasp. The chain of events and strategy was precisely the same.

Is anyone else aware of similar wasp/stick insect predator/prey relationships or this a regional evolutionary adaption of a predatory species to what is available?

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese insects and spiders on my Flickr site HERE……

sagansense:

Happy Birthday to David Attenborough!!

87 years and still going strong!

fitnessgeekpdx:



kristina-m:

vast-sea:

serene-cub:

does it make us look more animal or animals more human?

favourite thing ever

wow you can practically see the animal in the human, and the human in the animal



Since Human is a kind of animal, I’d say it shows that we are more animal and less important or special/unique than we make ourselves think.

fitnessgeekpdx:

kristina-m:

vast-sea:

serene-cub:

does it make us look more animal or animals more human?

favourite thing ever

wow you can practically see the animal in the human, and the human in the animal

Since Human is a kind of animal, I’d say it shows that we are more animal and less important or special/unique than we make ourselves think.

(Source: m-uerto)